Jobs’ Impact on Apple Demand: Not Much, Actually!

This is not to discredit Steve Jobs’ contribution to Apple. But it is more like a testament to his abilities that he turned a nearly bankrupt company into a tech behemoth which is no longer dependent on a cult figure for its success. A recent report has stated that the erstwhile CEO’s departure did not had much impact on Apple demand.

According to ChangeWave, a market research company, a survey revealed that only 4 percent of consumers are “less likely” to buy an Apple product after Steve Jobs’ resignation. On the other hand, a whopping 89 percent said that the shuffle in upper management is not likely to have any impact on their decision about buying the product.

The firm had conducted similar survey in 2008, when Steve Jobs had taken brief hiatus. At that time, considerably higher number of people had responded that they are “less likely” to buy Apple if Jobs steps down. The tally at that time stood at 18 percent and the proportion had been declining since then.

The firm conducted another survey regarding tablets. As expected, it showed that iPad remains the most favored tablet by far. It also showed that Apple tablet is the main choice of potential tablet buyers. About 80 percent of responders were in favor of iPad as their next tablet. About 10 percent of the responders were considering buying HP Tablet, which is a shame since the product has been discontinued since then. Also more and more companies are now interested in using tablets for managing their corporate affairs. About 86 percent of the companies are in the testing phase of deploying tablets in their organizations.

 

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- who has written 1054 posts on UK Gadget and Tech News, Reviews and Shopping.



3 Responses to “Jobs’ Impact on Apple Demand: Not Much, Actually!”

  1. Jack Hughes says:

    Seems like they’ve got it the wrong way around. People buy Apple products because they like them and find them useful. And probably because they are fashion items for a lot of people. I doubt many people ever bought Apple products just because Steve Jobs was behind it. The issue with Jobs leaving isn’t that a very few people will not buy because he isn’t there anymore but how Apple will miss his design nouse and ability to pick products to develop. If in a few years Apple are not bringing out highly desirable, fashionably products then people won’t buy them.

  2. millgate says:

    Far be it that I should criticise the ‘Steve Jobs’ phenomenon … but I do feel bound to comment on the Apple company’s lapse in common sense etc.

    I suspect that a clique in the company (probably the legal team …)has taken leave of its senses.

    If the Ford company had set out to sue say, Toyota, for having the effrontery to market a car similar to the Ford Focus – merely on the grounds that it had 4 seats and 4 wheels and an engine that ran on gasoline – the world would have fallen about laughing.

    No court in the world would have given any attention to Ford’s claim or arguments.

    But Apple’s case against Samsung falls into a technical field where greedy lawyers and ill-informed court officials and judges; in obscure locations can be fooled into believing Apple have a case.

    It is notable that these cases seem not to be exercised in the USA.

    It can now be hoped that here, in the UK, the latest taunt by Apple will be given the short shrift it deserves.

  3. millgate says:

    Far be it that I should criticise the ‘Steve Jobs’ phenomenon … but I do feel bound to comment on the Apple company’s lapse in common sense etc.

    I suspect that a clique in the company (probably the legal team …) has taken leave of its senses.

    If the Ford company had set out to sue say, Toyota, for having the effrontery to market a car similar to the Ford Focus – merely on the grounds that it had 4 seats and 4 wheels and an engine that ran on gasoline – the world would have fallen about laughing.

    No court in the world would have given any attention to Ford’s claim or arguments.

    But Apple’s case against Samsung falls into a technical field where greedy lawyers and ill-informed court officials and judges; in obscure locations, can be fooled into believing Apple have a case.

    It is notable that these cases seem not to be exercised in the USA.

    It can now be hoped that here, in the UK, the latest taunt by Apple v. Samsung will be given the short shrift it deserves.

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